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Booklet Tips From Paulette

Writing, producing, and promoting tips booklets for marketing, motivating, and making money.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Booklets and Respecting Your Colleagues

One of my most favorite ezines is SpeakerNetNews. It arrives every Friday in my inbox, and while speaking is not a primary part of my business, it's rare that there isn't something of value in each issue. It can be a resource or an opinion that resonates big-time. I always look forward to reading it.

There is usually a Topic of the Month that someone puts out there for others to give their input. The topic of this month has been about what happens when a colleague asks for a favor of some kind, and how you handle it. Some replies were more gracious and generous than others who were more direct and matter-of-fact in their limitation.

Unless you live under a rock somewhere, you've had the experience of a colleague asking you for something, and you were more or less thrilled about it.

When a colleague asks for a piece of information that is something you typically charge consulting or product dollars for, how do you handle it? If a colleague asks you for a lead or an introduction, where does that sit with you?

One of the approaches I liked in the replies was in leading with an offer before then asking for a favor. You may want someone to review your booklet or suggest some marketing direction or give you their experience in the sales process or any one of a dozen other possibilities.

Yesterday someone asked me what suggestions I had about how to price a licensing deal after the person received a no-cost educational tip in my weekly ezine. While the person is someone I like and who has been a long-time client, it stunned me to think the person didn't know the question was much more than a one-sentence answer, and that I have products and consulting services that address this very topic. It felt disrespectful, which I have the feeling the client didn't realize, and I didn't mention until I am mentioning it here now.

Next time you are thinking of enrolling a colleague in your business and/or professional education, think about what you can offer first. And then ask.

Until next time,
Paulette - who likes to be generous and also make a good living


4 Comments:

At 7:58 AM, Anonymous Chris Sier said...

I don't always know when making a request if I am asking something that I need to pay for. However, as part of my request I always say it is OK to say "no" or tell me a better way to get info (IE pay for services, etc.) To experts the answer may be much more complicated than I, the newbie, understands it to be. Being respectful in asking and being given an honest answer is respectful in return. Good thing to think about!

 
At 9:24 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 9:25 AM, Anonymous Paulette said...

It sounds like you are at least conscious of being respectful. Yes, I realize that people new to a situation don't know the scope and depth of things. However, the person who prompted my blog post does know better.

Keep in mind that money is not the only form of payment that can be useful. It could be an article, an introduction, an offer to do something, or an exchange of some kind. In certain situations, any of these can be more valuable than a financial payment.

Paulette

 
At 9:26 AM, Anonymous Paulette said...

It sounds like you are at least conscious of being respectful. Yes, I realize that people new to a situation don't know the scope and depth of things. However, the person who prompted my blog post does know better.

Keep in mind that money is not the only form of payment that can be useful. It could be an article, an introduction, an offer to do something, or an exchange of some kind. In certain situations, any of these can be more valuable than a financial payment.

 

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